New Technology Gives Wheat Growers a Head Start on Head Scab

First-of-its-kind fungicide makes on-time applications for head scab in wheat more attainable in 2019.

Treated soybean seeds protect roots so that plants can get off to a strong start.
Miravis Ace keeps wheat greener and healthier. All treatments included NIS .25% V/V Feekes 10.3 (5/3); Feekes 10.5 (5/5); Feekes 10.5.2 (5/10). Photos taken on 5/23, Lanexa, Virginia 2018.
Most wheat growers have experienced the stress of hearing Fusarium head blight (head scab) forecasts, knowing they need to spray their fungicide at flowering, but not being able to spray all of their crop in time. The narrow application window of older head scab fungicides combined with vast acres and inevitable delays from weather or applicator availability can make it difficult for growers to make sure their wheat is protected on time.

Grower Mark Birdsall of Berthold, North Dakota, is no stranger to this challenge. “As far as timing, when we push the window too early, we see reduced effectiveness of the fungicide. That happens a lot because people have acres to cover, and a lot of times the weather doesn’t cooperate with you to cover those acres.”

#SprayEarlier for head scab with a first-of-its-kind fungicide for #wheat.

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Treat for Head Scab on Your Schedule

With Miravis® Ace fungicide, growers like Mark no longer have to stress about spraying for head scab exactly at flowering. Miravis Ace is a first-of-its-kind fungicide that widens the application window by allowing for application as early as 50 percent head emergence up to flowering, without sacrificing efficacy or yield.

“Miravis Ace can completely change growers’ approach for head-scab management in wheat,” says Eric Tedford, Ph.D., fungicide technical product lead at Syngenta. “The power and stamina of Miravis Ace give growers and applicators more time to spray because of its unmatched residual, and that residual results in better head scab control for both the main heads and tillers.”

The Power Behind Miravis Ace

Adepidyn® fungicide, a carboxamide molecule in Miravis Ace, is the first active ingredient with an SDHI mode of action available for head scab. It provides the power and stamina for longer residual and application flexibility that growers will appreciate. Unlike older fungicides like Prosaro® 421 SC and Caramba® that must be applied at flowering—leaving little room for error or delay—Miravis Ace provides growers with a high-powered premix to more effectively manage head scab while taking care of other diseases such as Septoria leaf spot.

While some may be skeptical about being able to spray for head scab as early as 50 percent head emergence, field trials have consistently demonstrated how Miravis Ace outperforms older fungicides at both 50 percent head emergence and at flowering.

“Miravis Ace can completely change how growers approach head scab management in wheat.”

Eric Tedford
In a spring wheat trial where fungicides were applied at flowering, the head scab incidence with Miravis Ace was 2.3, while it was 7.7 with Prosaro 421 SC.* In the trial below, Miravis Ace out-yielded other treatments at both 50 percent head emergence and flowering.
FAD150A3-2018US


“The wider application window from Miravis Ace will allow growers to better manage head scab and their schedule, knowing they can maximize on-time coverage of their wheat acres with a more powerful tool,” says Tedford.

To learn more, growers should contact their local Syngenta sales representative or visit SprayEarlier.com.

*Application date: July 2. Head scab index = incidence x severity / 100. Prosper, North Dakota 2018. Prosaro 421 SC is not labeled for use at 50 percent head emergence and no recommendation or suggestion for use at this timing is being made. Data is intended solely for comparison at this application timing with Miravis Ace, which is labeled for use as early as 50 percent head emergence. Performance assessments are based upon results or analysis of public information, field observations and/or Syngenta evaluations. Trial reflects treatment rates commonly recommended in the marketplace.